I don’t know what style category I fit into. I seem to have casual, sexy, girly, punk and tomboy. I even like the sporty style. It actually depends on my mood but most of the time, I like romantic clothes with lace, chic stuff, and if I don’t feel like dressing up, I just want casual or tomboy. Usually with crop tops and high waisted jeans. What….am I???


It was during this period that many design houses began to hire artists to sketch or paint designs for garments. The images were shown to clients, which was much cheaper than producing an actual sample garment in the workroom. If the client liked their design, they ordered it and the resulting garment made money for the house. Thus, the tradition of designers sketching out garment designs instead of presenting completed garments on models to customers began as an economy.
Christian Lacroix directs his devotion and talent for fantasy and theatrics to create true design spectacles. Lacroix arrived in the 80s with the opening of his fashion house and immediately set the world on fire with unexpected mixes of colors and patterns. “The idea of seeing everybody clad the same is not really my cup of tea“. This is one of the best quotes of Lacroix, fighting for unique and irreverent pieces in the world of fashion.
In the 80’s, Ralph Lauren really became a force to be reckoned with, as his signature polo shirts for men, with their ubiquitous polo pony and rider, became coveted items for many different demographics. Available in every color of the rainbow, they lined his coffers and allowed him to put more money into his glamorous women’s wear lines; he especially enjoyed producing couture pieces and overseeing glossy runway shows.

As an extension of the above furry trend, it was plain to see across the runways in each and every fashion capital that feathers were the detail of the moment. Either used for bonkers accessories or dotted onto the finest of silk-chiffon blouses to make them quiver ever so, this trend spans from clothes to accessories and back again. You'll see the high street adopting it for party season and in the shoe department.

Like Halston, Calvin Klein epitomized disco glamour in the freewheeling late Seventies. His tight designer jeans, which clung to the sleek bodies of the greatest beauties of the day, including the young Brooke Shields, cemented his fame and made him millions of dollars. However, Calvin Klein’s reign continued well into the 80’s and 90’s – his spare, stripped-down designs offered a minimalist perspective that carried a very modern message. The use of sexuality in his ads was often a keystone of his success; his campaigns were designed to send overt messages and perhaps to shock. Today, his empire is still strong, despite some turbulence in the late nineties: his suits, dresses, and couture still offer a unique viewpoint.
So many fashion houses have adopted certain features for clothing, which later on become their business cards. It seems simple at first sight, but looking into it, we realize that those are the characteristics that make those brands stand out. Examples of such can be the following: black and red lace in Dolce and Gabbana collections, expressive asymmetry in Antonio Berardi clothes and so on.

Long vests, which the planners have been playing around with for a couple of seasons now, are perfect for the pre-fall season, particularly in light of the way that pre-fall is the season for outerwear that you have been so amped up for. A possibility for the 70’s jackets and overcoats, long vests have a diminishing effect on the body, especially when left detached. They can be worn in the pre-fall September isolated, displaying the revealed arms, with sweater when it gets colder, or even used for a layered look.
The first true “Chanel suit” was produced in 1925; Coco used chains to weigh down the fabric, so that it hung “just so”. She favored ornamentation such as ribbons, pretty buttons, and ropes of pearls. Her feminine touches added style and impact to her wearable designs; in fact, even vintage Chanel designs remain remarkably timeless and easy to wear.

Vivienne Westwood, the godmother of punk, is considered one of the most unconventional and outspoken fashion designers in the world. Westwood’s fashions woke to fame in the late 1970s when her early designs helped shape the look of the punk rock movement. The highly influential shop changed its name and décor with every collection, and would later be credited for setting off both the punk trend and the new romantic wave. In 1981, Westwood launched her signature collection and has since continued to shock and amuse the fashion world with her hard-core Anglomania.

Born in August of 1883, Gabrielle Chanel was a French native who was destined to liberate women from the constraints of corsets and other uncomfortable garments. A true rebel and visionary, Chanel, who changed her name to Coco after a brief career as a singer, preferred to wear clothes she could move freely in; often, her style were imbued with a mannish aesthetic. Indeed, Coco Chanel, who designed her first cardigan to avoid pulling any garment over her head, was really the originator of modern women’s sportswear. Her desire for freedom and self-expression gave women style without sacrifice…

Over in London, things were distinctly more aggressive: Punk and themes of dissonance could be felt strongly (Brexit, much?), with plenty of tartan, more safety pins than even Johnny Rotten could handle and Vivienne Westwood staging an entire protest about climate change for her show. The strong mood could clearly be felt over the Channel, too, as British designer Sarah Burton's vision for Alexander McQueen this coming season established the poshest and most brilliantly executed iteration on punk we've seen in a long, long time. And talking of being combative, if you don't pick up on the "army" theme of many of the season's biggest shows (Bottega Veneta, Chloé, Miu Miu) and end up buying a pair of combat boots, I'll eat my bucket hat.


Latest 2019 Fashion Trends for Women. It’s another year, a fresh start, and the ideal time to refresh your closet with quality pieces and crisp outlines for 2019. Be strong and go after those snakeskin donkeys or silk aircraft. It’s another season, and you’re reevaluating yourself and your storage room, recollect? We have picked a portion of the most recent and most wearable design patterns for ladies. Along these lines, let us investigate the Top 10 Fashion Trends in 2019 for Women to adopt.

Ready-to-wear, or prêt-à-porter, clothes are a cross between haute couture and mass market. They are not made for individual customers, but great care is taken in the choice and cut of the fabric. Clothes are made in small quantities to guarantee exclusivity, so they are rather expensive. Ready-to-wear collections are usually presented by fashion houses each season during a period known as Fashion Week. This takes place on a citywide basis and occurs twice a year. The main seasons of Fashion Week include: spring/summer, fall/winter, resort, swim, and bridal.
It’s rather easy to describe the sporty fashion style: it’s sporty! Girls will typically wear some popular sport companies like Adidas or Nike and will always have runner shoes (or similar style shoes) on. They prefer a simple and subtle look that oozes ‘sports’, with plain colors like white, black, and gray being BIG hits. They won’t strive for anything fashionable or flashy and would prefer sweatpants, tight runner pants, and basic tees. Don’t forget the ponytail to finish it off!
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